Month: May 2013

Revisiting Keahualaka

I am on a journey of spiritual rediscovery with Kauaʻi. My childhood was filled with camping trips at Māhāʻulepū, going on long hikes through Kōkeʻe, and exploring the abandoned cane field roads behind my house in ʻŌmaʻo. It was a time filled with wonder and a developing kinship with the sands that raised me. Becoming a practitioner of hula, I now see Kauaʻi in a very different light, through a cultural lens that I hadn’t developed when I lived there as a child. Kauaʻi is an old island, not just geologically, but mythically. Below its thick and glossy image as a tourist destination, before even the rich local culture developed out of the plantation lifestyle, Kauaʻi is the backdrop to many of the traditional staples of hula and oli. It is home to mystical places and magical events in Hawaiian mythology, particularly those related to Pele and her ʻohana. I went home to Kaua’i this past weekend and made it a point to visit Keahualaka. The heiau is literally translated to “the shrine of Laka” and holds …

Onekahakaha Beach Park

Pringles, tuna relish sandwiches, RC cola, Coppertone sunscreen and my pink Strawberry Shortcake swimsuit are the treasured memories I have of the “shi shi” beach. As a youth, almost daily, especially during the summer months, my mom would pack up the car and take me to Onekahakaha Beach Park located in Keaukaha. Being an only child and with family living abroad, it usually was just my mom and I, on these outings. But once at the beach, we always met other locals or mainland visitors, and eventually made some really good friends. Late Friday afternoon, I had the opportunity to meet up with some sweet mamas and their keiki from the Big Island Babywearing Group at Onekahakaha Beach Park. It has been close to 30 years since I went back to this keiki friendly beach. The Hawai’i County Parks and Recreation has done a fabulous job of updating the pavilions, improving the landscape to avoid all the recurring puddles, and putting in more picnic benches and grass for families to layout and play. Seeing the …

Lessons in the Aisles of Longs

Inspired by a Sunday visit to Longs, after a stampede left me in the dust to load carts up with what was listed in the new sale paper of the week. 1) Be flexible in life, yet sturdy in your convictions, like a pair of jeans with elastic waistbands. You’ll always be comfortable and in timeless fashion. 2) Striking up spontaneous conversations with strangers is a completely acceptable form of community building. Especially when the person you’re talking to passes on valuable cooking/baking tips and product recommendations. 3) Being told you remind someone of their relative (sister, cousin, nephew, granddaughter, best friend) is a compliment. People don’t usually tell others that by looking at them, they’re reminded of someone they can’t stand. 4) Let people behind you with a few items go ahead of you at the checkout and return your wagon when you’re done unloading. It’s just the right thing to do. 5) Smile at people with your eyes and mean it. It makes everyone feel comfortable. Besides, smiling without your eyes just looks …

Hoʻiʻo Perfection

I don’t recall eating hoʻiʻo growing up on Kauaʻi, but since discovering it here on Hawaiʻi Island, it’s been a welcome addition to meals. Hoʻiʻo bunches begin making appearances at the local farmers’ markets during the wet season and go for about $2 a hefty bunch. Hoʻiʻo are fern shoots that grow and are gathered in wet areas here. They are made into salads or added to stir-fry. Hoʻiʻo is a regional term used here on Hawai’i Island. It’s Pohole in Maui. You’ll also hear the term warabi, which is derived from Japan. Despite not growing up with this yummy vegetable, over the past several years I’ve learned how to cook it. Friends and loved ones request my hoʻiʻo salad for parties and casual get-togethers. People wonder how I get the hoʻiʻo cooked, but still crunchy. The trick is blanching. Here are the steps to get your hoʻiʻo just right: In a big pot, bring water to a rolling boil. After cleaning and cutting the hoʻiʻo into bite-sized pieces, separate the thicker stems from the …

Blogs We Adore

We’re new to the world of blogging, but we’ve been going around and meeting the neighbors. Our list of faves is small, but definitely growing. Food I Love Coffee Travel and Munches Humor Brittany, Herself Girl on the Contrary I Am Begging My Mother Not To Read This Blog Lifestyle Basil One One Salty Kiss A Beautiful Mess A Cup of Jo He Wahī Paʻakai: A Package of Salt Pilihonua Family 21 Delights Diapers & Daisies Momaste Travel A New Life Wandering Eh, Bueno! Introvert Japan Katie in Korea No Ramen, No Life Shoyu Sugar Travelling the World Solo